random stuff / astronomy ʕ •ᴥ•ʔ

wildcat2030:

Gigantic ‘Energy Duck’ Could Generate Solar and Hydro Power for Copenhagen
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The Energy Duck is a submission to the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) 2014, this year held in Copenhagen, Denmark. Designed by the London-based team of Hareth Pochee, Adam Khan, Louis Leger, and Patrick Fryer, the iconic and engaging public artwork proposal is a renewable energy generator and storehouse, an interactive and educative tourist destination, and a celebration of local wildlife. (via Gigantic ‘Energy Duck’ Could Generate Solar and Hydro Power for Copenhagen | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building)

(via awkwardscotty)

Notes
83
Posted
2 days ago
afro-dominicano:

Coming out to See the Moon by Doug Waters


  "A supermoon rises over Bogue Inlet Pier as admirers have come out to view its splendor."

afro-dominicano:

Coming out to See the Moon by Doug Waters

"A supermoon rises over Bogue Inlet Pier as admirers have come out to view its splendor."

Notes
227
Posted
2 days ago
space-pics:

The Carina Nebula in Visible Light. Absolutely Incredible. [2560x1479]http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

space-pics:

The Carina Nebula in Visible Light. Absolutely Incredible. [2560x1479]
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Notes
171
Posted
2 days ago
heythereuniverse:

Crescent Moon (NASA, International Space Station Science, 11/03/07) | NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

heythereuniverse:

Crescent Moon (NASA, International Space Station Science, 11/03/07) | NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

Notes
57
Posted
2 days ago
afro-dominicano:

Mapping the Mass of an Enormous Galaxy Cluster


  You are looking at the most precise gravity map ever made of a distant galaxy cluster. Using the map, astronomers have determined that the cluster is roughly 650,000 light-years across and contains enough matter to make 160 trillion suns.
  
  Image: ESA/Hubble, NASA, HST Frontier Fields Acknowledgement: Mathilde Jauzac (Durham University, UK and Astrophysics & Cosmology Research Unit, South Africa) and Jean-Paul Kneib (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
  
  The cluster, known as MCS J0416.1–2403, is located about 4 billion light-years away and consists of hundreds of galaxies all orbiting one another. Newton’s gravitational equations can tell you the mass of two objects orbiting one another, provided you already know the mass of one of them. However, because these galaxies are all so distant, there is no way for scientists to determine any of their individual masses.
  
  But there is another way. Einstein’s theory of general relativity tells us that heavy objects warp the fabric of space-time around them. As light travels through these warped regions it will become distorted, and we see that as smeared out rings and arcs in our telescopes, an effect known as gravitational lensing. Using the Hubble space telescope, astronomers identified smudges in the light seen around MCS J0416.1–2403. These distortions are images of even more distant galaxies sitting behind the cluster; their light has been lensed by its enormous mass. By carefully determining just how much the light is smeared out, researchers can calculate the amount of matter sitting within the galaxy cluster.
  
  The 160 trillion solar masses includes both visible matter and dark matter, which gives off no light but makes up the bulk of the cluster’s mass. By studying the dynamics of all the galaxies within the cluster, astronomers can better understand this mysterious substance. Researchers will also continue mapping the smeared out images to increase the precision of their mass calculations, learning about the cluster’s finer details to figure out its history and evolution.

afro-dominicano:

Mapping the Mass of an Enormous Galaxy Cluster

You are looking at the most precise gravity map ever made of a distant galaxy cluster. Using the map, astronomers have determined that the cluster is roughly 650,000 light-years across and contains enough matter to make 160 trillion suns.

Image: ESA/Hubble, NASA, HST Frontier Fields Acknowledgement: Mathilde Jauzac (Durham University, UK and Astrophysics & Cosmology Research Unit, South Africa) and Jean-Paul Kneib (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)

The cluster, known as MCS J0416.1–2403, is located about 4 billion light-years away and consists of hundreds of galaxies all orbiting one another. Newton’s gravitational equations can tell you the mass of two objects orbiting one another, provided you already know the mass of one of them. However, because these galaxies are all so distant, there is no way for scientists to determine any of their individual masses.

But there is another way. Einstein’s theory of general relativity tells us that heavy objects warp the fabric of space-time around them. As light travels through these warped regions it will become distorted, and we see that as smeared out rings and arcs in our telescopes, an effect known as gravitational lensing. Using the Hubble space telescope, astronomers identified smudges in the light seen around MCS J0416.1–2403. These distortions are images of even more distant galaxies sitting behind the cluster; their light has been lensed by its enormous mass. By carefully determining just how much the light is smeared out, researchers can calculate the amount of matter sitting within the galaxy cluster.

The 160 trillion solar masses includes both visible matter and dark matter, which gives off no light but makes up the bulk of the cluster’s mass. By studying the dynamics of all the galaxies within the cluster, astronomers can better understand this mysterious substance. Researchers will also continue mapping the smeared out images to increase the precision of their mass calculations, learning about the cluster’s finer details to figure out its history and evolution.

Notes
296
Posted
2 days ago
hydrogeneportfolio:

"Maybe we’re on Mars because of the magnificent science that can be done there - the gates of the wonder world are opening in our time. Maybe we’re on Mars because we have to be, because there’s a deep nomadic impulse built into us by the evolutionary process, we come after all, from hunter gatherers, and for 99.9% of our tenure on Earth we’ve been wanderers. And, the next place to wander to, is Mars. But whatever the reason you’re on Mars is, I’m glad you’re there. And I wish I was with you.”
— Carl Sagan

hydrogeneportfolio:

"Maybe we’re on Mars because of the magnificent science that can be done there - the gates of the wonder world are opening in our time. Maybe we’re on Mars because we have to be, because there’s a deep nomadic impulse built into us by the evolutionary process, we come after all, from hunter gatherers, and for 99.9% of our tenure on Earth we’ve been wanderers. And, the next place to wander to, is Mars. But whatever the reason you’re on Mars is, I’m glad you’re there. And I wish I was with you.

 Carl Sagan

(via astrotastic)

Notes
2195
Posted
2 days ago

clirtyclan:

hileona:

sluttyoliveoil:

date a girl who eats books

eat a girl who dates books

Book a date to eat girls

(via iamsamosa)

Notes
252314
Posted
1 month ago

spaceplasma:

Solar magnetohydrodynamics

The sun is a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system that is not well understood. It is thought that the energy necessary to heat the corona is provided by turbulent motion in the convection zone below the photosphere, and two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain coronal heating:

The first is wave heating, in which sound, gravitational or magnetohydrodynamic waves are produced by turbulence in the convection zone. These waves travel upward and dissipate in the corona, depositing their energy in the ambient gas in the form of heat. The other is magnetic heating, in which magnetic energy is continuously built up by photospheric motion and released through magnetic reconnection in the form of large solar flares and myriad similar but smaller events—nanoflares.Currently, it is unclear whether waves are an efficient heating mechanism.

The field of MHD was initiated by Hannes Alfvén, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1970. He described the class of MHD waves now known as Alfvén waves. Observations show that all waves except Alfvén waves have been found to dissipate or refract before reaching the corona. Current research focus has therefore shifted towards flare heating mechanisms.

The magnetic filament above erupted on April 19, 2010. The black “hair-like object” is a speck of dust on the CCD camera.

Credit: SDO/AIA

(via we-are-star-stuff)

Notes
767
Posted
1 month ago

homohustle:

jotarokujo:

what if the new animal species we discover each year are actually being dropped off by aliens? like they have an over abundance of yeti crabs or something and so they brought some to earth because they knew we’d get a kick out of this

image

This is the cutest conspiracy theory I’ve ever heard

(via meggannn)

Notes
63304
Posted
1 month ago
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